Exclusive stream: Chris Stamey, “Anyway” from Lovesick Blues (2013)

Check out an exclusive advance stream of “Anyway,” from Chris Stamey’s upcoming album Lovesick Blues, due on February 5, 2013 from Yep Roc Records. You’ll need to click HERE to listen via SoundCloud.

Co-founder of the legendary indie-pop band the dB’s, Stamey’s last solo effort was a 2005 collaboration with Yo La Tengo. More recently, he returned to the original lineup of the dB’s for their first new studio project together since 1982′s Repercussion.

Our Nick DeRiso called the resulting Falling Off the Sky album one of the best albums of 2012.

As with the new dB’s project, “Anyway” and the rest of Lovesick Blues were polished up at Modern Recording, the studio at Chapel Hill, North Carolina that Stamey has operated for some two decades. There, he’s already helmed recordings for bands like Flat Duo Jets, Alejandro Escovedo and Whiskeytown, among others.

Between solo projects, Stamey has also worked as musical director for a series of concerts focusing on Big Star’s Third Album, presented with an all-star cast in Austin, London, New York and in North Carolina. The sessions from Lovesick Blues included members of the Fellow Travellers, who have been part of those Big Star shows; and musicians from the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra.

The album was co-produced by Old Ceremony’s Jeff Crawford, who’s also based in North Carolina. Together, they’ve fashioned something that aspires, finally, to the kind of late-night recording Stamey has always been after, he says.

[SOMETHING ELSE! REWIND: Chris Stamey joined us for an in-depth chat about his forthcoming solo record, reuniting with the dB's, and the lasting impact of North Carolina guitar legend Sam Moss.]

“I wanted to make a record that could make you feel less alone, like someone else has been there before you,” Stamey explains. “I was thinking about records like The Ballad of Todd Rundgren and Nick Drake’s Bryter Layter and Robert Wyatt’s “At Last I Am Free” and Richard Thompson’s Small Town Romance. Those are all records that were a source of comfort to me at various points in my life. They were records that seemed to speak one-on-one, records that weren’t trying to sell you anything. It’s that old saw about the blues being sad yet making you feel better. None of the songs on Lovesick Blues are traditional three-chord blues, but some of them speak that same emotional language.”

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