Archive for July 16th, 2012

Neal Morse makes bold return to prog rock with second release of 2012

Neal Morse returns once again to mainstream progressive rock with the September 11 release Momentum, to be followed by a North American tour.

'Internet has changed everything': Eddie Van Halen addresses outcry over reworking old demos

Something of a firestorm broke out among some when David Lee Roth offhandedly confirmed that Van Halen had reworked some old songs for its then-still pending reunion project, A Different Kind of Truth.

Cancer claims co-founding Deep Purple keyboard legend Jon Lord

Keyboardist Jon Lord, a key element of the Deep Purple sound and co-writer of their signature track “Smoke on the Water,” has died at 71. He had battled pancreatic cancer since a diagnosis last August.

'A classic album with a young, hip edge': Paul McCartney reportedly working with Mark Ronson

From getting the plug pulled, to reportedly plugging in with celebrated producer Mark Ronson, it’s been a busy week for Paul McCartney.

Brad Hammonds Group – Greene Street (2012)

I’m not sure if it’s the composing pen of someone who’s soaked in Ani DeFranco, Tool, Metallica and Shakti, or the insertion of an electric bass among all those acoutsic string instruments or

New Music Monday: John Frusciante, Susanna Hoffs, Soul Asylum, Billy Joe Shaver

Get ready to tear into new releases from John Frusciante of Red Hot Chili Peppers fame, Jimbo Mathus of Squirrel Nut Zippers fame, Susanna Hoffs of Bangles fame, and Soul Asylum — of one-hit wonder fame.

Fred's Country Fried Rock: Whiskey Myers, “Ballad of a Southern Man” (2011)

It’s not the words you string together, but how you put them together that counts.

Half Notes: Soul Asylum – Delayed Reaction (2012)

Soul Asylum is back following a six-year gap between projects, the last of which was completed by Dave Pirner and Co. as bassist Karl Mueller succumbed to cancer.

Sparks Fly On E Street: Bruce Springsteen, "Wreck On The Highway" (1980)

Mortality and the very, very thin line between life and death, those ideas quietly rumble just beneath the surface on most of The River‘s more serious tracks.