Forgotten series: Andwellas Dream – Love and Poetry (1968)

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Sitting tight as one of the finest psychedelic statements of the era, Love and Poetry marked the introduction of this talented trio based in Northern Ireland. Originally pressed on the CBS label in 1968, the album bombed in terms of sales, but those fortunate enough to hear it readily recognize its artistic greatness.

A whistling flute, clicking finger cymbals and ringing Chinese bells open the proceedings on the gorgeously haunting “Lost A Number, Found A King,” and then there’s “Man Without A Name,” which crunches and crackles to a catchy country pop beat. Powered by rumbling, tumbling rhythms, “Sunday” steps in as a first class heavyweight rocker, where “The Days Grew Longer For Love” teases the listener into thinking it’s a smooth and easy pop piece before ballooning into an ear-shattering showcase of wailing guitar tricks worthy of Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page.

Sprinkled with tinkling piano passages, “Cocaine” keenly superimposes cocktail jazz motifs onto a freaky acid-infested canvas, while tracks like “Felix” and “Take My Road” effectively illustrate the dynamic interplay between guitars, drums and keyboards. Always in harmony with each other, Andwellas Dream never failed to lock it all together. Projecting a good range, the vocals are impressive as well. The band was just as skilled at crooning a pop tune as they were blowing their lungs out on a hard rocking cut. Melodic awareness, fused with a knack for writing, arranging and structuring gripping songs serve as further top-drawer traits connected with Andwellas Dream.

A few bonus tracks are added onto a 2006 reissue of Love and Poetry (Lightning Tree Records), most notably the bad and bluesy “Mister Sunshine (Junkie Woman Blues)” and the gospel flavored “Mrs. Man.” Presenting a compatible crosspollination of psychedelic experimentation, blues, jazz, country and pop rock, Love and Poetry sweeps, soars and shines with ambitious concepts. Progressive but not pretentious, here’s a record sure to be savored by fans of bands such as Procol Harum and Traffic.

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Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson

Beverly Paterson was born the day Ben E. King hit No. 4 with "Stand By Me" -- which is actually one of her favorite songs, especially John Lennon's version. She's contributed to Lance Monthly and Amplifier, and served as Rock Beat International's associate editor. Paterson has also published Inside Out, and Twist & Shake. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Beverly Paterson
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