Fred's Country Fried Rock: Scott H. Biram, “I Want My Mojo Back” (2011)

Share this:

The one-man band deal is pretty hard to pull off. I’ve heard quite a few that end up coming off as pretty corny. Biram, though, has the skills as he shows on his 2011 album Bad Ingredients.

Biram’s one of the many members of the underground country movement that comes from a background in punk, rock and heavy metal, and you can occasionally hear shades of those in his music. Not so much in this song, though, if you don’t count the little Ted Nugent-style speaking rant toward the end. If there’s any influence you can pinpoint in this song, it would have to be the swampy, New Orleans blues of Dr. John. Biram delivers the song in a great voodoo growl, and even though he’s a Texas boy, he can almost make a Louisiana native like me believe that he’s from the bayou.

But wait, you say, I hear some backing vocals and horns in here. I thought you said this was a one-man band. Well, that’s part of the beauty of Biram’s talent. There’s a little more involved in “I Want My Mojo Back” than in most of Biram’s songs, but his live performance is impressive. If you check out this song live, the horns will be gone, as will be the spooky effects, but you won’t miss much else. Biram’s guitar skills are impressive, and he can play his instrument to make you at times believe there’s a second guitarist hidden behind the curtain. On this tune, he also sings his own backing vocals, and though it’s a little weird to watch him doing it, I have to admit he does it impressively.

And finally, yes, he is saying what you think he is in the chorus about a raccoon body part. I’ll let you Google the details, but there are several Southern legends that say it can bring love or good luck.

All it takes is one look and listen to Biram to realize that there’s not a fake bone in his body. He’s often crass, sometimes a little goofy, but always honest and entertaining. He’ll never make it in today’s Nashville, but there’s more talent in the right hand that he picks his guitar with than in most current country hitmakers put together.

[amazon_enhanced asin=”B005JTCTC4″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B0020H479G” container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B005HI7NI2″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B000UPT7Z4″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /] [amazon_enhanced asin=”B000FWGYO4″ container=”” container_class=”” price=”All” background_color=”FFFFFF” link_color=”000000″ text_color=”0000FF” /]

Fred Phillips

Fred Phillips

Fred Phillips is a veteran entertainment writer with a love of hard rock and heavy metal. He has written music reviews, columns and feature stories for several newspapers, Web sites and a national wire service, while running a stand-alone site called Hall of the Mountain King in various places and incarnations since 1997. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelse reviews.com.
Fred Phillips
Share this:
Close