Archive for April 2nd, 2012

The Black Keys are ready to put out a live album — but they say the venue name has to be right

As the Black Keys continue to tour in support of their current release El Camino, drummer Patrick Carney says they’re recording every show — in the hopes of putting out a new live album. The problem? They keep playing places like the Bojangles Coliseum, and (no kidding) the 1-800-ASK-GARY Amphitheatre.

Synth-pop pioneer Gary Numan on being recognized as a key influence: ‘Thankfully, I’m still here’

Lately, electronic music-innovator Gary Numan has been getting notable mentions as an inspiration and influence from a broad spectrum of stars, including Trent Reznor, David Bowie, Beck, Marilyn Mason, Battles, Queens of the Stone Age and Dave Grohl.

Warren Haynes 'put a lot of love and reverence' into new Tommy Bolin tribute project

Warren Haynes says that he helped construct a new tribute album to Tommy Bolin with an eye toward what the former Deep Purple and James Gang guitarist would have been interested in: “I don’t think we chose anyone who would make Tommy grimace,” Haynes says, adding: “Hopefully not!” with a laugh.

James Taylor – Mud Slide Slim And The Blue Horizon (1971; 2012 Audio Fidelity Remaster)

Sudden success can change people, and not always for the better. James Taylor had become an overnight sensation in 1970 on the strength of his second album

Forgotten series: The Sneetches – 1985-1991 (1991)

Named after those funny Dr. Seuss characters we all know and love, the Sneetches were greatly adored by the indie crowd back in the day.

New Music Monday: Dr. John, Ian Anderson, Tab Benoit, James Taylor, David Sylvian

Another Monday, another teetering stack of new music goodness — just waiting to be tipped over, then rifled through.

One Track Mind: A Fragile Tomorrow, "Waters Part" (2012)

A Fragile Tomorrow continues to explore 1980s indie-rock sounds here, even as they steadily build upon those core influences.

Sparks Fly On E Street: Bruce Springsteen, "Independence Day" (1980)

Back in Bruce’s storytelling days, he would introduce “Independence Day” with the sad tale of how he and his dad never did see eye-to-eye. It was years later that they finally could talk, and there was more than a little regret