Download: Four free songs from Andrew Bird, including his new single "Eyeoneye"

Noisetrade is offering a free download of a four-song EP by Andrew Bird in advance of the release of his new album Break It Yourself on March 6.

The EP includes “Eyeoneye,” Bird’s lead single for Break It Yourself; along with “The Crown Salesman” and “So Much Wine” from a recently released advance seven-inch; and an additional song from the Break It Yourself sessions called “After Dinner Jam.”

The entire Break It Yourself project will be available for streaming on Monday, February 27, at NPR.org. For a list of future concert dates, and to find out how you can get free music with your tickets, go to andrewbird.net/ticketbundle.

Here’s a look at our recent thoughts on Andrew Bird. Click through the titles for complete reviews …

ANDREW BIRD – NOBLE BEAST/USELESS CREATURES (2009): I hear a good melody and I am hooked — the kind of thing that sounds like it is crawling over and through the nooks and crannies of the music as if a centipede is making its way through the busy forest undergrowth. And that’s what Bird’s music is: Busy forest undergrowth, with a beautiful melody weaving its way through it, across it, and sometimes opposed to it. The lush background is entrancing, often based much on hymn. Bird plays violin, guitar, mandolin, and glockenspiel, (not to mention whistling), sometimes looping it all. But the listener may just be most drawn to his vocal melody, which is that centipede I mention above, tasked not only with flexing and bending over a complex terrain, but also with the intricately verbose, multi-syllabic lyrics Bird can’t help but explore in every song.

ANDREW BIRD – ARMCHAIR APOCRYPHA (2007): It was going to be hard for Bird to top his previous album, Andrew Bird And The Mysterious Production Of Eggs, a gorgeous, moody stunner. Equally balanced between upbeat rock numbers and quieter strings-backed pieces, Eggs had something for everyone, with smart, subtly-humorous lyrics strewn throughout to keep listeners coming back and making it a highlight of the year. With Armchair Apocrypha, it seemed as if he hadn’t even attempted to replicate what worked right on Eggs — and luckily this worked in everyone’s favor. A rather more muscular affair (and we’re speaking on relative terms here, remember), Apocrypha relied more heavily on guitars than strings than anything Bird had produced before. But his signature sense of melody and humor was ever-present, tying everything together in an ear-pleasing bundle.

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Something Else!

The Something Else! webzine, an accredited Google News affiliate, has been featured in The New York Times and NPR.com's A Blog Supreme, while our writers have also been published by USA Today, Jazz.com and UltimateClassicRock.com, among others. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.