Sparks Fly On E Street: Bruce Springsteen, "Streets Of Fire" (1978)

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It’s a short, inner-directed musing, but one that encapsulates the desperation that’s one of the essential elements of Darkness On The Edge Of Town. Bruce wanted this album to be relentless, to never let up — even for a single refrain — on its emotional focus. “Streets of Fire” takes that idea and filters it through a wall of distorted, tension-laced guitar.

And: one very nasty guitar solo. This is another example that I’ll gladly provide when I say that Springsteen is one of my favorite guitar players. No, the solo isn’t built on a lot of notes. Instead, he chooses just the right notes, and leans on them heavily. Check out the Paramount version below for yet another example of Bruce wringing the emotion out of that Fender.

Up next: Prove It All Night

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Mark Saleski

Mark Saleski

Mark Saleski is a writer and music obsessive based out of the woods of central New Hampshire. A past contributor to Jazz.com, Blogcritics.org and Salon, he originated several of our weekly features including the Friday Morning Listen, (Cross the) Heartland, WTF! Wednesday, and Sparks Fly on E Street. Follow him on Twitter: @msaleski. Contact Something Else! at reviews@somethingelsereviews.com.
Mark Saleski
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