Bachman and Turner to appear with Will Ferrell in new film from 'Austin Powers' director

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Bachman and Turner, the Canadian rock legends, will be taking care of business in “Dog Fight,” a new film from “Austin Powers” director Jay Roach starring Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis.

Guitarist Randy Bachman and bassist Fred Turner will play the classic rock radio hit “Takin’ Care of Business,” originally recorded as Bachman-Turner Overdrive, during the movie — set for release later this year. “It was really hard work, long days and about 200 people on set,” the band’s manager Gilles Paquin told the Winnipeg Free Press. “But it’s one of the biggest movies of the year and it’s great positioning for the band.”

“Dog Fight” stars John Lithgow, Dan Aykroyd and Dylan McDermott. The plot finds Ferrell and Galifianakis portraying North Carolina candidates running for the same congressional seat. Bachman and Turner play at the winner’s celebration rally.

Here’s a look back at our recent thoughts on Bachman and Turner, and BTO. Click through the titles for complete reviews …

BACHMAN AND TURNER – BACHMAN AND TURNER (2010): Randy Bachman and Fred Turner reunited for the first time since the mid-1970s and in 2010 issued a record of all new tunes that reside entirely in the spirit of the old BTO, called, simply, Bachman and Turner. Turner’s full throated voice is completely intact, as are Bachman’s massive riffs and chops. For anyone else playing guitar like that, I’d be tempted to call it clichéd, but Bachman invented these much-imitated licks. So why not make it official and call it a BTO album? Blame it on some legal stuff. But it doesn’t take a lawyer to figure out that this is a record by the same masterminds behind one of the most successful hard-rockin’ bands of the Watergate era. This is a welcome return.

BACHMAN-TURNER OVERDRIVE – NOT FRAGILE (1974; 2011 reissue): BTO’s brand of meat ‘n’ potatoes, blue collar rock stood in direct opposition of some of the artsy prog rock that was at the height of its popularity at the time—indeed, the title Not Fragile is said to be the answer to Yes’ Fragile. They played up the part to perfection, naming “Overdrive” after a trucker magazine, dressed in regular street garb devoid of sequins, platform shoes and open shirts. With lyrics anybody older than three can understand. That compliment sounds a bit backhanded, but BTO at their best executed the game plan to near perfection, and when they did, they were a hell of a lot of fun to listen to. Never were they executing as well as they were on Not Fragile.

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